Medical use of Lungwort

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Early this Spring when we had first moved into our new home, I noticed a spotted green leafy plant with pinkish-violet bell-shaped blossoms growing in the back garden. As we were landscaping the front garden and has as yet no early bloomers in the border, I moved a clump of this plant there.

Later when at the garden centre I asked what this plant was, and was given the named ‘Pulmonia’. I now know that it is actually called Pulmonaria Officinalis and that it has been used medically for hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years in Europe.

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I used an infusion of 5 fresh leaves of this plant infused for 10 minutes in a cup of near-boiling water today to treat my husbands sore throat. Though the remedies I’ve read called for dried leaves, I thought to give fresh ones a go. He does say his throat feels better and it’s only been about 15 minutes since he gargled the tea. As there are some toxins in this plant, any application should either be external or used as a gargle – but not swallowed.

The following was taken from www.herbsociety.org.uk :
Medicinally only the leaves are used.  They contain saponins, allantoins, silica, flavonoids, tannins, vitamin C and mucilage.  Lungwort has long been used as a herbal treatment for lung diseases, such as tuberculosis, asthma and coughs.  The success of lungwort in treating these conditions may be down to the fact that it contains antibiotics which act against bacteria.  The silica and allantoin content of lungwort may be the reason this herb is recommended for its wound healing properties and for use externally for treating eczema, hemorrhoids, varicose veins, wounds and burns.  The leaves are astringent and have been used to help staunch bleeding.

When made into a tea, the leaves are also used as an expectorant, to relieve congestion and ease a sore throat (often mixed with coltsfoot and cowslip flowers).
The leaves are astringent and have been used to help staunch bleeding.  When made into a tea, the leaves are also used as an expectorant, to relieve congestion and ease a sore throat (often mixed with coltsfoot and cowslip flowers).

 

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