Prison Vegetable Garden: A Different Type of Walled Garden

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Tour of a prison vegetable garden, a look at how the produce is used to feed inmates, and how the program is used in the prison’s resettlement program. Full video of the prison gardens and polytunnels.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
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I was wandering around the Sulby horticultural show some years ago when I overheard an odd comment. It was a woman remarking to another that the prison has scooped up all the awards again. Sure enough, many of the winning entries listed the Isle of Man Prison. Since then, I’ve often wondered about the prison vegetable garden. If prison is for punishing criminals, was gardening being used as a punishment? This year I finally got the chance to see what it was all about for myself.

Arriving at the Isle of Man Prison

I visited the prison on a wet and gloomy morning, its grey walls looming up to meet a grey sky. It was intimidating entering such a secured facility, even though a warm welcome awaited me inside. Not long after I was directed into a waiting room, I was met by Nigel Fisher, Deputy Governor, and Johannes ‘Vossie’ Vorster, Senior Resettlement Officer. They gave me a tour earlier in the year when very little was growing. Their big smiles told me I had a lot more to see this time.

A tour of a prison vegetable garden, a look at how growing fresh vegetables is used in the prison kitchen, and ways that the program is used in the prison's resettlement program #lovelygreens #vegetablegarden #permaculture #gardening #growyourown #greennews #organicgardening

Vossie is the go-to man for the prison’s gardening program and he enthusiastically showed me around the grounds. Patiently he opened and locked gates as we passed through each building, yard, and section.

The Prison Vegetable Garden

If you’d like to watch a video of the prison vegetable garden, you’ll find it just above. Outside there are three separate areas used for vegetable gardening. There’s a small herb bed in the women’s quarters, but the larger gardens are worked by the men. These are separated into two areas — one for the general prison population and the other for vulnerable prisoners. Both areas have open-air garden beds and a polytunnel.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
Tomatoes growing in one of the prison polytunnels

What I saw growing there was a far cry from the barren soil I was introduced to in April. One poly tunnel was filled with gorgeous tomatoes and cucumbers. The other had dozens of pepper plants, aubergines, and courgettes. Trays of fresh homegrown vegetables destined for the kitchen were waiting outside one of them. Growing outside was cabbage, carrots, lettuce, and everything in between. Not bad, considering the exposed site and the fact that none of the prisoners had prior gardening experience.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
The prison vegetable garden back in April when very little was growing

Interviewing prisoners

That’s not the only challenge. Getting seeds and having them at the right time can be difficult. One prisoner has a magazine subscription that gets delivered with a packet of seeds every month. Every one of those seeds is put to good use. They also grow many of their crops from kitchen scraps. This year all their very productive pepper plants were grown from seeds they saved from shop-bought veg. One prisoner told me about collecting them from the bin, drying them, and sowing them earlier in the spring.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
Cabbage and leeks growing a stone’s throw from the prison’s walls.

Another prisoner who will be released soon is already looking for an allotment. Growing vegetables has impacted him so much that he wants to continue growing veg as a free man. Only a handful of prisoners were working when I was there, and for discretion, I didn’t film their faces. I did speak to two on audio, and you can hear what they have to say in the video further up in this piece.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
Tall walls surround the prison vegetable garden

Very low costs

It’s not costing a lot for the prison to run the vegetable garden scheme, either. Though they obviously supply the land and the supervision needed, everything else has come via donation. The polytunnels, composted manure, additional seeds, and tools.

The prison vegetable garden produced so much produce over the summer that it stopped having to buy it in. That’s a lot of money being saved, considering that they’re preparing three meals a day for almost a hundred prisoners. A peek inside the kitchen’s walk-in refrigerator shows it stocked with boxes of homegrown tomatoes, carrots, greens, and peppers.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
The second main gardening area is home to various beds and a composting area

Progressive prison strategy

There’s another way that tax payer’s money is being saved that isn’t initially evident. I spoke at length with Prison Governor Bob McColm, and it was clear that, first and foremost, this program is about rehabilitation. Every one of the prisoners held in their facility will be released in anywhere from a few weeks to under twenty years.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
The day’s harvest heading for the kitchen.

With the horticultural certificate program that he hopes to introduce, prisoners will be able to find employment after they’ve been freed. He says that giving prisoners access to jobs after release can cut re-offenses by an incredible 95%. That makes our Island safer for everyone and reduces the cost of housing re-offenders. Though I don’t have an exact figure for how much it costs to house a prisoner every year on the Isle of Man, in the UK, it’s about £23,000. In the interim, gardening is good for instilling responsibility and for getting the prisoners out in the fresh air.

Visiting a Prison Vegetable Garden: how growing vegetables is helping prison inmates find a new path #lovelygreens #gardentherapy #growyourown
The Isle of Man Prison’s vegetables at a local agricultural show

Bettering Our Community

Using gardening not as a reward but as therapy can also help address mental and emotional issues. In the end, we have to ask ourselves what kind of neighbor we’d like to live next to — one who has been ‘punished’ or one that has been rehabilitated? That brings me back to the Sulby Horticultural Show. Those prison entries weren’t just about racking up the awards; they were a way of saying, ‘Hey, we’re here, and we want to contribute.’ I think the Isle of Man Food Bank will agree as well. Every piece of prison veg entered into the show was donated to help the Island’s needy.

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