Easy & Delicious Blackcurrant Liqueur Recipe

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A simple recipe for sweet and smooth blackcurrant rum liqueur. Mix it into champagne for Kir Royale or sip it neat. It’s like Ribena for adults.

Kids in Britain grow up on Ribena, a cordial made with concentrated blackcurrant juice, sugar, and a few other things. I’m not saying it’s healthy, but everyone’s had it. Saying that, very few people actually eat blackcurrants. They might decorate the top a fancy pavlova, but in the shop, they’re few and far between. Plump and juicy and bursting with zingy fruitiness, they make excellent preserves, wine, and liqueurs.

This easy recipe for blackcurrant rum liqueur is one of the best I’ve come across. I’ve been making it on and off for seven years and after it’s infused, it lasts for months. Though all its liquid is rum, you wouldn’t know it, and you’ll instantly be reminded of Ribena. It’s sweet and smooth and I like to sip it neat from a small glass — a larger one would be a little dangerous! Blackcurrant liqueur is one of the best ways to preserve that delicious summery taste.

A simple recipe for sweet and smooth blackcurrant rum liqueur. Mix it into champagne for Kir Royale or sip it neat. It's like Ribena for adults #blackcurrantrecipe #preserving

A simple recipe for sweet and smooth blackcurrant rum liqueur. Mix it into champagne for Kir Royale or sip it neat. It's like Ribena for adults #blackcurrantrecipe #preserving

Growing Blackcurrants

If you live in Britain, Europe, or parts of North America, you might be able to find blackcurrants at a farmers market. If not, you can grow your own. Check to make sure there aren’t restrictions on growing Ribes in your area and if your garden is suitable. They prefer temperate climates with rich, well-drained soil. In an open position, they’ll grow over five feet tall but in containers, they’ll stay a bit smaller. Though they’re self-fertile, they produce more berries when planted with others.

Related to redcurrants, gooseberries, and jostaberries, blackcurrants are a Ribe and very easy to propagate from cuttings. If you know someone who has one, it’s very easy to start off your own plant from a small branch of theirs. Literally stick it in the ground and it will grow into a new plant. Make sure that the plant isn’t suffering from any disease though first.

A simple recipe for sweet and smooth blackcurrant rum liqueur. Mix it into champagne for Kir Royale or sip it neat. It's like Ribena for adults #blackcurrantrecipe #preserving
Juicy blackcurrants make a delicious and fruity liqueur

Blackcurrant liqueur Recipe

  • Gold Jamaican Rum
  • Blackcurrants
  • Sugar or Agave Syrup
A simple recipe for sweet and smooth blackcurrant rum liqueur. Mix it into champagne for Kir Royale or sip it neat. It's like Ribena for adults #blackcurrantrecipe #preserving
Begin by half-filling a jar with blackcurrants

Make Blackcurrant Liqueur

The method is incredibly simple. Half-fill a large preserving jar with ripe blackcurrants. Squish or tear each one open as you pop it inside. Fill the rest of the container with rum and seal. Now comes the difficult part, waiting for the berries to infuse. Let the mixture sit for one to two months in a dark and cool place. Give the jar a swirl every few days if you can remember.

Strain the now vibrant red liquid from the berries and add sugar and/or agave syrup to taste. I tend to use about a cup of granulated sugar per 750ml of liquid and it will take a few days of swirling it around in the liquid for the sugar to dissolve. You can use less (or more!) so the sweetness factor is up to you. Pour into clean, sterilized bottles and use within a year. The flavor should be rich, sweet, and delicious on its own. You can also mix it with champagne to make Kir Royale. It’s an easy recipe and I have no doubt that if you make it once, you’ll be making it again and again for years to come.

A simple recipe for sweet and smooth blackcurrant rum liqueur. Mix it into champagne for Kir Royale or sip it neat. It's like Ribena for adults #blackcurrantrecipe #preserving
Over time the rum will change from its original golden color to a deeper red

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18 Comments

  1. Have been wondering what to do with blackcurrants this year….this solves my problem. Great idea, thank you for sharing!

  2. Do you have any videos on sterilizing bottles, or one that you recommend? I’m looking forward to trying this in the coming year :)

    1. I don’t yet, but there are two main methods that I use. The first is running the bottles through the dishwasher on a normal cycle without soap. The other is placing clean and dry bottles in the oven at 275F (or 130C) for thirty minutes. Just make sure that no part of the bottle is plastic (such as a cap) if you use the latter method.

  3. Tanya! ….I just put out a call on the facebooks and tweeters for which booze I should buy next. This sold me. I'm in. Also, we should have a cocktail party ;)

  4. I will try this. Currants are very good this year.

    1. Byron Wills says:

      Would this work using boyson berries in spiced rum?

  5. This is a much more sensible recipe than the one I've just tried. Most of it ended up down my kitchen cabinets (there's a photo if you can bear to see it…) and quite a lot of things are pink now. It'll be a while before I do anything with blackcurrants again.

    1. Hilary Levan says:

      I made my best gin with blackcurrant! Have tried rhubarb and orange zest which was also delish, but blackcurrant was best!

  6. Also where did you find wine jugs w cork glass?

    1. You could reuse a clear wine bottle but I'd recommend that you stick with a screw cap version to keep costs down. I make my own wine so already have the equipment to cork bottles.

  7. I have some muleberries I picked and froze. I can thaw out some out and use rum or vodka? I just have to cut off the stems.

  8. Thanks Tanya. I'm going to try this with youngberries this year – though I'll probably use vodka instead ;)