Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients #beautyrecipe #skincarerecipe #lotionrecipe
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Rose Hand Cream Recipe with Honey and Rosewater

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Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients

Making lotion and skincare can seem a little daunting. What is it made of anyway? Each formulation is different but at the heart of all lotion recipes is water, oil, and an ingredient that will bind them together — to emulsify them. This wild rose hand cream recipe is no different, though the water is replaced by rosewater. The final product is a rich cream that you can use to condition and moisturize your hands or body.

gives a brief introduction to the key ingredients. It’s a relatively simple process that involves mixing rose petal-infused water with oils and other ingredients including an emulsifier. It’s a floral-scented moisturizing cream that can be stored in a pot or jar for up to 18 months. Once opened, you should use it within six months.

Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients #lotionrecipe #roserecipe #skincarerecipe

Rose Water Infusion

Rosewater is a wonderful ingredient to use in your handmade creams since it smells beautiful and is sensitive enough for most skin types. Using it on your skin will help soothe inflammation and even skin tone.

You can purchase true distilled Rose Water in health food stores and some supermarkets as it’s used in cooking. One of my favorite food recipes that uses it is Turkish delight! If you have access to rose petals, you can also make a version of it yourself using this infusion method. If using fresh, I would recommend that you use old-fashioned, apothecary, or wild roses.

Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients #lotionrecipe #roserecipe #skincarerecipe
Use purchased or homemade rosewater for this cream recipe

Rose Hand Cream Ingredients

You’ll need quite a few other base ingredients to make your own cream which will include your emulsifying agents, oils and butters, humectants (moisture adding/trapping element), thickeners, and a preservative.

If you choose not to use a preservative in your cream please note that your final product must be kept refrigerated and should be used within a week. Any product that contains water is a place where bacteria and fungus can grow and they’ll be present even if you can’t see the contamination.

Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients #lotionrecipe #roserecipe #skincarerecipe
Some of the lotion ingredients in this rose hand cream recipe

Lotion Ingredients and What They Do

The preservative in this recipe is Geogard Ultra, a broad-spectrum agent used in natural and organic creams and the thickener is xanthan gum, a product of sugar fermentation and used in the food industry. If you’d like a thinner cream, you can leave xanthan gum out of this recipe.

Sodium lactate is a natural alpha-hydroxy that is also produced through the fermentation of sugar. It provides a smooth and slick texture and extra moisture, but again, is optional.

Emulsifying wax is the ingredient that will marry all the ingredients used to make the cream. On the molecular level, this brittle and waxy substance attracts water to itself on one end and oil on the other. If you do not use an appropriate emulsifier then your cream will eventually separate back into water and oil.

Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients #lotionrecipe #roserecipe #skincarerecipe
You can use honey as a humectant in cream and lotion recipes

Using Honey in Creams

The humectant I’ve chosen for this recipe is pure honey – from my own bees of course! If you don’t produce your own you can easily purchase a pot from a local health food store or beekeeping association.

Humectants work to draw water from the surrounding air, helping to keep your skin naturally moisturized. A little bit goes a long way though so be careful not to go overboard with this ingredient – too much and your cream will feel sticky. For even more uses for honey, head over here.

Rich and Protective Oils

The oils chosen for this recipe are protective, moisturizing, and easily absorbed by the skin. Shea butter is rich and creamy, and rice bran will seep in to help keep your hands feeling soft and smooth. The rosehip seed oil that you add in the cooling phase is a delicate oil that nourishes your skin. It’s also used in anti-aging formulas.

Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients #lotionrecipe #roserecipe #skincarerecipe
Rose water is the base of this rose hand cream recipe
Make this rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe using wild rose petals and raw honey. Includes step-by-step instructions and guidance on lotion ingredients #beautyrecipe #skincarerecipe #lotionrecipe

Rose Hand Cream Recipe with Honey and Rosewater

lovelygreens
Step-by-step instructions for making a rich and moisturizing handmade rose hand cream recipe. Uses rosewater and honey and makes one 100ml pot but can be scaled up for larger batches.
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Cooling time 4 hrs
Total Time 5 hrs
Servings 100 ml

Equipment

Ingredients
  

Homemade Rosewater (optional step)

Water Phase

Oil Phase

Cooling Phase

Instructions
 

Make the Rosewater

  • True rosewater is the byproduct of rose essential oil distillation. You can either purchase it to use in this recipe or make a simple rose-infusion. The process is over here and usually results in a pink liquid. True rosewater is clear.

Prepare the Oil & Water Phases

  • Sterilize all of your equipment by running it through the dishwasher. Wash your hands thoroughly, and consider wearing disposable gloves while making rose hand cream.
  • Measure the ingredients of the oil phase into one heat-proof glass jar. Stir well to incorporate the xanthan gum.
  • Measure the water phase ingredients in a second jar. Next, place both the jars in a large saucepan that has a folded kitchen towel or washcloth at the bottom. This is to keep the direct heat of the pan from cracking the glass jars.
  • Fill the pan with an inch of water. Bring it to a boil then reduce the heat to a simmer. Keep the jars in the hot water until the oil phase is completely melted and the contents of both jars are about 165°F (75°C). Take the jars out, and place them on a kitchen towel on the counter.
  • Next, pour the water phase into the oil-phase jar. You'll see it immediately turn an opaque milky color. Gently stir with a spoon for several minutes, then let it cool for ten minutes. Leave the spoon inside the jar since you'll need to return five minutes later to give it another stir. At this point the cream will be liquidy, so don't panic if it's not thick.

Cooling Phase

  • Cool the hand cream to 120°F (49°C). As it cools, it will thicken up slightly. Return every twenty minutes or so to gently stir.
  • While the hand cream is cooling, mix the Geogard Ultra and rosewater together. It helps to warm the rosewater a little, so you could place it in a ramekin and warm it in the pan of hot water.
  • When the rose hand cream has cooled, stir in the cooling phase ingredients.
  • If you make this hand cream without a preservative, it will last up to one week in the refrigerator. After that time, invisible bacteria and fungi will begin colonizing it and it will probably not be something you want to put on your face. Microbes love a water-based environment!
    To preserve it for longer, you will need to add a broad-spectrum preservative. While there are optional ingredients in the cooling phase the Geogard Ultra, or another true preservative is not one of them.
    Many other broad-spectrum preservatives need adding at precise amounts and temperatures. If you choose another type, please refer to the manufacturer's instructions.

Testing the pH

  • Now we need to test for pH. Stir a half teaspoon of rose hand cream in 1-2 tsp distilled water. Dip one of your pH papers into liquid and then compare the color to the ones on the pack. Lotion and skin creams need to match the pH of your skin or they can be irritating and affect the effectivity of preservatives. If the pH is between 4.5-5.5 you're spot on. 
    You can make the hand cream more acidic (lower the pH) up by adding tiny amounts of lactic acid or citric acid dissolved in a small amount of warm, distilled water. Make it more alkaline (increase the pH) with triethanolamine or by dissolving a small amount of L-Arginine or bicarbonate (baking soda) in water and adding it. Pass it through the sieve and into the lotion. Take the pH reading again and adjust again if needed.
  • Using a rubber spatula, spoon the rose hand cream into a sterile container and seal. You can begin using it immediately but it will continue thickening up over the next few days.
    Recipe for making handmade Wild Rose & Honey Body Cream

Notes

*You can use another broad-spectrum cosmetic preservative if you wish
Keyword chamomile, lotion, skin care recipe
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

32 Comments

  1. Hi Tanya!
    I’m excited to try this recipe…it looks so decadent! What would you suggest as a replacement for xanthan gum? Could I use a small amount of stearic acid in the heated phase to thicken it? If so, how much would you suggest?
    Thanks for the wonderful recipes and all your hard work! I appreciate it so much!
    Lisa

    1. Hi Lisa and you could leave xanthan gum out if you wish. It’s a thickener, and without it the cream will just have a runnier consistency (like lotion). Yes, you could add other thickeners in if you wish, including stearic acid, carnauba wax, beeswax, and guar gum.

  2. Hi Tanya,

    I just came across your Wild Rose and Honey hand cream. I would like to make a larger amount than what the recipe is. I would like to convert to a larger batch but I am having a hard time. Do you by chance have percentages for each ingredient in the recipe. That would make it easier to convert for me.

  3. Hi, I'm going to try and make your hand cream but was wondering if it was possible to use beeswax instead of emulsifying wax and if so, how much beeswax to use?

  4. Hi I enjoyed reading the posting, I like making my own cosmetics too and I would love to try this one. I can get a hold of most of ingredients here. The problem however, is that I can't find Geoguard Ultra and Sodium Lactate. I have found one website where they sell Geoguard Ultra but they sell it by pounds ( I don't need that much!) and its too expensive. Where did you buy them?

    1. You can use another preservative instead of Geogard Ultra if you can't find it. Another alternative would be to combine Potassium Sorbate with benzyl alcohol and phenoxyethoanol – speak to your local supplier of beauty products for more information on what they offer and advise. Also, Sodium Lactate is an extra humicant (honey is also) and you can omit it if you choose.

  5. Hi! i really hope i can find all the ingredients here in Argentina, ive never made lotions, (just played around with butters and oils) What would be a good natural preservative to make it last?

    1. Hi Olenka – I've been using Geogard Ultra, which is a preservative approved for 'natural' and organic skincare but you'll have a wide choice of preservatives out there that you can use. What I'd recommend is getting in touch with a local distributor of ingredients for creams and lotions and discuss your options.

  6. hello!
    wonderful post!
    i've been thinking about starting to make my own soap and bath bombs, but now i want to make this too!
    :D
    i was wondering, for how long can you use this cream? i mean how long till it starts going bad?
    thank you so much!

  7. Love this Tanya! I'm new to your page but in the short time I've enjoyed your blog, I have learned so much! And plan to keep coming back for more! IVe made a few things so far but cream is something I have started working on …I also signed up for some work/shop/courses at the Montreal Botanical Gardens …I really look forward too them! They start this week, Sept 13th :-) ….

  8. You amaze me with the neat things you come up with! I like your mason jars, I hope you can find lids in the UK, they are getting expensive here so I use the reusable ones from Tattler (an online company).

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